Computer Languages

Where to Go Next ~ Range

Go version 1.0 arrived in late 2009. It’s now a well established language and ecosystem, having carved out a significant niche in server integration and bespoke webserver code, amongst others.

Unashamedly a quirky language, Go’s developers pioneered an opinionated approach to minimalism that has evidently served it well.

This post will focus on iteration in Go using range. Later posts will take a more detailed look at a few other Go features.

Google's Go Revisited

At the end of 2009, a delightfully “little” programming language was fully released following a few years of gestation. I wrote back then about the major features of Google’s Go. Nearly two years of intensive Scala, Java and Groovy work later, I felt it was time to revisit Go with one question in mind: with so much new-found enthusiasm for non-Java languages around, what has Go got to offer that might make it stand out from the crowd?

Move over Java, Scala has arrived!

Scala is a general purpose programming language designed to express common programming patterns in a concise, elegant, and type-safe way. It smoothly integrates features of object-oriented and functional languages. It is also fully interoperable with Java. Code sizes are typically reduced by a factor of two to three when compared to an equivalent Java application. Scala - The New Kid on the Block Actually not so very new, Scala was initially developed during 2001 - 2003.

Google's Go

Google’s Go Language has been making news since the publicity launch in November ‘09.  Go combines the development speed of working in a dynamic language like Python with the performance and safety of a compiled language like C or C++. Go is not like Java and it doesn’t aim to be like Java. Rather, think of it as C++ for the 21st century. No … correct that - it’s a bit more than C++ but yet rather a lot less than C++.